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Article summary:

1. Federal judges have ordered South Carolina lawmakers to draw new congressional maps, ruling that the U.S. House district lines of a seat flipped by Democrats four years ago were intentionally redrawn to split Black neighborhoods and dilute their voting power.

2. The state used the maps in this past November’s midterm elections after the Republican-dominated state Legislature redrew the lines earlier this year following the 2020 U.S. Census.

3. Civil rights groups swiftly filed a lawsuit charging the state Legislature with choosing “perhaps the worst option of the available maps” for Black voters, and federal judges requested state lawmakers pass new U.S. House maps by the end of March, saying no elections can take place in the 1st District until it is redrawn.

Article analysis:

This article is generally reliable and trustworthy as it provides an accurate account of events related to South Carolina's US House district being ruled a racial gerrymander by federal judges, including details about how Republicans had redrawn district lines earlier this year following the 2020 US Census, civil rights groups filing a lawsuit against these changes, and how no elections can take place in the 1st District until it is redrawn by March 2021. The article also includes quotes from relevant parties such as Speaker Murrell Smith and Rep Nancy Mace which adds credibility to its reporting.

However, there are some potential biases present in this article which could be explored further for more balanced reporting. For example, while it does mention that Republicans held a thin margin in US House prior to redistricting, it does not provide any information about Democrats' position or any potential implications of redistricting on their representation in Congress. Additionally, while it mentions that civil rights groups filed a lawsuit against these changes due to them being potentially discriminatory towards Black voters, there is no exploration into other minority groups who may have been affected by these changes or any counterarguments from those who support them (e.g., Republicans).

In conclusion, while this article provides an accurate account of events related to South Carolina's US House district being ruled a racial gerrymander by federal judges, there are some potential biases present which could be explored further for more balanced reporting such as exploring both sides of the argument equally and providing more information about other minority groups who may have been affected by these changes.