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Article summary:

1. The Ministry of Health reported that the rolling average of new daily cases dropped slightly to 2738.

2. Around 10% of Covid-19 infections result in Long Covid, which can cause a variety of symptoms such as weakness and fatigue, neurological symptoms, and respiratory problems.

3. Vaccination only partially reduces the risk of Long Covid, and there could already be a potential 200,000 Long Covid cases in New Zealand.

Article analysis:

This article is about the growing number of Kiwis reinfected with Covid-19 and the potential for Long Covid to become the leading cause of disability in New Zealand. The article is based on an interview with University of Otago epidemiologist Michael Baker who discussed the prevalence of Long Covid in New Zealand and its potential effects on public health.

The article is generally reliable as it provides accurate information from a credible source (Michael Baker). However, there are some issues with trustworthiness and reliability that should be noted. Firstly, while the article does provide some evidence for its claims (e.g., citing a Nature Reviews Microbiology paper), it does not provide enough evidence to support all its claims (e.g., regarding vaccine efficacy). Secondly, while the article does mention possible risks associated with Long Covid (e.g., permanent disability), it does not explore these risks in any detail or present both sides equally (i.e., potential benefits as well as risks). Thirdly, while the article mentions that seroprevalence studies have been delayed due to health sector reforms, it does not explain why this has happened or what impact this may have on public health outcomes. Finally, while the article mentions that experts believe reinfection rates are likely underestimated, it does not provide any evidence to support this claim or explore possible reasons why this might be so (e.g., lack of testing).

In conclusion, while this article is generally reliable and provides accurate information from a credible source, there are some issues with trustworthiness and reliability that should be noted including lack of evidence for certain claims made; lack of exploration into possible risks associated with Long Covid; lack of explanation for delays in seroprevalence studies; and lack of evidence to support claims about underestimation of reinfection rates.