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Article summary:

1. Victoria Brownworth's partner of 23 years died suddenly, and when she posted about it on Twitter, she was met with anti-vax trolling.

2. The video Died Suddenly claims that a dangerous vaccine is killing off swathes of young people but this claim falls apart under scrutiny.

3. The film uses out-of-context news reports and images to paint an alarming picture of something suspicious going on, but further investigation reveals that the deaths featured are explained by alternative causes or are still alive.

Article analysis:

The article “They died suddenly - then the anti-vax trolling started” by BBC News is a well-written piece that provides an in-depth look at the issue of anti-vaccination trolling and its effects on those who have lost loved ones due to Covid-19. The article does a good job of presenting both sides of the argument, providing evidence for both pro and anti-vaccine positions. However, there are some areas where the article could be improved upon in terms of trustworthiness and reliability.

Firstly, while the article does provide evidence for both sides of the argument, it does not explore counterarguments in depth or present them equally. For example, while it mentions that serious side effects from Covid vaccines are rare, it does not provide any evidence to back up this claim or explore any potential risks associated with taking them. Additionally, while it mentions that blood clots can be caused by a range of things other than vaccines (such as smoking or having Covid), it does not provide any evidence to support this claim either.

Secondly, while the article does mention some genuine deaths related to Covid vaccines, it fails to mention any potential risks associated with taking them or explore any counterarguments in depth. This could lead readers to believe that taking a Covid vaccine is completely safe without considering any potential risks involved.

Finally, while the article does provide some evidence for its claims (such as data from Ontario showing no increase in stillbirths after vaccination), it fails to provide sources for all its claims which could make readers question their validity and accuracy. Additionally, some of the claims made in the video used as evidence (such as Keyontae Johnson dying suddenly) are false which could lead readers to doubt its credibility even further.

In conclusion, while “They died suddenly - then the anti-vax trolling started” by BBC News is an informative piece on anti-vaccination trolling and its effects on those who have lost loved ones due to Covid-19, there are some areas where it could be improved upon in terms of trustworthiness and reliability such as exploring counterarguments more deeply and providing sources for all its claims.