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Article summary:

1. The all-or-nothing thinking of Jesus Mythicism ignores the fact that miracles and supernatural elements were commonly believed in during the first century AD.

2. People who accept Jesus Mythicism often bring assumptions and enthusiasm from strident Christianity to their newfound belief.

3. Miracle stories are not a solid indicator of ahistoricity, as similar elements can be found in accounts of historical figures.

Article analysis:

The article presents an argument for why Jesus Mythicism should not be accepted as a valid explanation for the origins of Christianity, based on its reliance on “all or nothing” thinking and its tendency to ignore the fact that miracles and supernatural elements were commonly believed in during the first century AD. The article is written from a neutral point of view, presenting both sides of the argument fairly and without bias. It acknowledges that some people may find Jesus Mythicism appealing due to its simplicity, but also points out that it ignores nuance, uncertainty, provisionalism and ambiguity which are required in mainstream historical analysis of Christian origins.

The article does provide evidence for its claims by citing examples from ancient literature which contain elements considered “miraculous” or “supernatural”, such as Suetonius’ biography of Augustus which includes a story about his miraculous conception. However, it does not explore any counterarguments or present any evidence against Jesus Mythicism, leaving readers with only one side of the argument presented. Additionally, while it acknowledges that some people may find Jesus Mythicism appealing due to its simplicity, it does not provide any insight into why this might be so or what other factors might contribute to someone's acceptance of this theory.

In conclusion, while this article provides an interesting perspective on why Jesus Mythicism should not be accepted as a valid explanation for the origins of Christianity, it fails to provide an equal amount of evidence for both sides of the argument and does not explore any potential counterarguments or other factors which could contribute to someone's acceptance of this theory. As such, readers should take this article with a grain of salt and consider other sources before forming their own opinion on this matter.