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Article summary:

1. Deryk Smooke and Elizabeth Oldham are two Nova Scotians who have been suffering from long COVID, which is a range of post-infection health impacts that linger at least three months after contracting the coronavirus.

2. Statistics Canada data suggests 1.4 million adults experienced symptoms three months after a confirmed or suspected COVID-19 infection, and some people with long COVID are so severely impacted they are unable to work.

3. The federal government has employment insurance and disability benefits available to people suffering from long COVID, but there is still not enough help for those affected financially, medically, or emotionally.

Article analysis:

The article “It’s terribly lonely”: Some Nova Scotians with long COVID just want to return to work | CBC News is generally reliable in its reporting of the issue of long Covid in Nova Scotia. It provides an overview of the situation by introducing two individuals who have been affected by it and providing statistics from Statistics Canada on the prevalence of long Covid in Canada. The article also mentions the financial implications of having long Covid, such as unemployment, bankruptcy, household debts, financial difficulties, and using up retirement savings. Furthermore, it outlines the federal government’s response to this issue by providing employment insurance and disability benefits for those affected by it.

However, there are some potential biases in this article that should be noted. For example, while it does mention the federal government’s response to this issue, it does not provide any information about what other levels of government (e.g., provincial or municipal) may be doing to address this issue or provide support for those affected by it. Additionally, while the article does mention that there is not enough help for those affected financially, medically or emotionally due to long Covid, it does not provide any specific examples of what kind of help could be provided or how these issues could be addressed more effectively. Finally, while the article does mention that there are potential risks associated with lifting “common-sense restrictions” such as mandatory masking and isolation after a Covid-19 infection (i.e., increased burden on healthcare systems), it does not explore any counterarguments or present both sides equally when discussing this issue.