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Article summary:

1. A TV doctor is urging parents to get their children vaccinated against measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) as the latest data shows that around one in 10 children starting school are at risk of measles due to a drop in MMR vaccination uptake.

2. Measles can lead to complications such as ear infections, pneumonia, and inflammation of the brain which require hospitalisation and on rare occasions can lead to long term disability or death.

3. The NHS has to prioritise routine vaccinations throughout the disruption and Dr Sara Kayat, an NHS doctor, understands why parents have been hesitant to get their children vaccinated due to fear surrounding Covid-19.

Article analysis:

The article “Doctor urges parents to get children vaccinated as MMR jab rate drops - Hull Live” is written by an unknown author and published on Hull Live website. The article discusses the importance of getting children vaccinated against measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) as the latest data shows that around one in 10 children starting school are at risk of measles due to a drop in MMR vaccination uptake. The article is mostly reliable but there are some potential biases present in it.

Firstly, the article does not provide any evidence for its claims about the decline in MMR vaccination uptake or its effects on public health. It also does not mention any sources for its claims or provide any statistics or studies that support them. This lack of evidence makes it difficult for readers to assess the accuracy of the information presented in the article. Additionally, while it mentions possible risks associated with not getting vaccinated, it does not explore any counterarguments or discuss potential benefits of not getting vaccinated either.

Secondly, while Dr Sara Kayat is mentioned several times throughout the article as an expert source on this topic, her credentials are not provided nor is she identified as a medical professional or expert in this field. This lack of information makes it difficult for readers to assess her credibility and trustworthiness when making decisions about their own health care choices.

Finally, while the article does mention that parents should check their child’s Red Book (personal child health record) before deciding whether or not they should get their child vaccinated, it does not provide any further information about how they can do so or where they can find more information about vaccines and immunizations if needed.

In conclusion, while this article provides some useful information about why parents should consider getting their children vaccinated against measles, mumps and rubella (MMR), there are some potential biases present which make it difficult for readers to assess its trustworthiness and reliability when making decisions about their own health care choices.