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Article summary:

1. The arrival fallacy is the mistaken belief that achieving goals will make you happy.

2. The impact bias leads to an overestimation of the duration and intensity of positive emotions associated with goal achievement.

3. Strategies to manage the arrival fallacy include avoiding when/then happiness projections, focusing on the journey rather than the outcome, and proactively looking for positives in life.

Article analysis:

The article provides a comprehensive overview of the concept of the “arrival fallacy”, which is defined as mistakenly believing that achieving goals will make one happy. The article draws upon research from Harvard-trained psychologist Dr Tal Ben-Shahar and Dr Maya Pilin to explain why predictions about how future events might make one feel are often inaccurate due to the impact bias, which leads to an overestimation of positive emotions associated with goal achievement.

The article is generally reliable and trustworthy in its presentation of information, as it provides evidence from credible sources such as Dr Tal Ben-Shahar and Dr Maya Pilin to support its claims. Furthermore, it presents both sides of the argument by exploring why people fall prey to the arrival fallacy as well as strategies for managing it.

However, there are some potential biases present in the article that should be noted. For example, while it does provide evidence from credible sources such as Dr Tal Ben-Shahar and Dr Maya Pilin, it does not explore any counterarguments or alternative perspectives on this topic. Additionally, while it does provide strategies for managing the arrival fallacy, it does not discuss any potential risks associated with these strategies or how they may be applied in different contexts or situations.

In conclusion, overall this article is reliable and trustworthy in its presentation of information regarding the concept of “the arrival fallacy” but could benefit from further exploration into counterarguments or alternative perspectives on this topic as well as potential risks associated with strategies for managing it.