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Article summary:

1. Cobalt is an essential component of modern life, found in lithium-ion rechargeable batteries and superalloys used to manufacture jet engines.

2. Most of the world's cobalt supply is mined in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), where Chinese companies run many of the industrial mines and buying houses that purchase cobalt from local miners, including children as young as six.

3. Companies sourcing cobalt from DRC must take responsibility for ensuring their supply chains are free from exploitation, cruelty, slavery, and child labour by investing in decent pay, safe working conditions, healthcare, education and general wellbeing for miners.

Article analysis:

The article “Is your phone tainted by the misery of 35,000 children in Congo’s mines?” by Siddharth Kara provides a detailed account of the exploitation of Congolese miners for cobalt production. The article is well-researched and provides a comprehensive overview of the issue at hand. It includes interviews with miners and traders as well as data gathered from 31 artisanal mining sites across the region. The author also provides insights into how cobalt is sourced from DRC to be sold to major component manufacturers and consumer electronic companies around the world.

The article does not appear to have any biases or one-sided reporting; it presents both sides equally without promoting any particular point of view or agenda. All claims made are supported with evidence such as interviews with miners and traders as well as data gathered from 31 artisanal mining sites across the region. The author also acknowledges that while market prices of cobalt have spiked 300% in the past two years, none of that increase makes its way down to creuseurs like Arthur who spend up to 24 hours at a time in narrow tunnels unable to stand hacking away for cobalt with no guarantee they will get paid fairly or even survive due to frequent tunnel collapses burying alive everyone inside.

The article does not appear to be missing any points of consideration or evidence for its claims made; all relevant information has been included such as interviews with miners and traders as well as data gathered from 31 artisanal mining sites across the region which provide insight into how cobalt is sourced from DRC to be sold to major component manufacturers and consumer electronic companies around the world. Furthermore, possible risks are noted such as toxicity assaulting at every turn due to earth and water being contaminated with industrial runoff, air being brown with noxious haze, grave injury risk due to working in putrid conditions for pitiful wages, risk of death due to frequent tunnel collapses burying alive everyone inside etc., thus providing readers with a comprehensive understanding of what is happening on ground level in Congo’s mines.

In conclusion, this article appears trustworthy and reliable; it provides a comprehensive overview of what is happening on ground level in Congo’s mines without any biases or one-sided reporting while noting possible risks associated with working there so readers can make an informed decision about whether they want their products sourced from these mines or not.